The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Infectious Disease

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Infectious Disease

The Impact of Globalization on Infectious Disease Emergence and Control: Exploring the Consequences and Opportunities—Workshop Summary (2006)

Humans, animals, and food are moving around the world more frequently and more easily than ever before—and carrying disease causing agents with them. In today's globalized world, disease can spread quickly and is no longer contained to isolated geographical areas. Malaria is one example. Twenty years ago only 20% of the world's population was living in areas where malaria is endemic but now that number has risen to 40%. While globalization increases the risk of the spread of infectious disease, it also facilitates more collaboration and better communication that will allow for a more comprehensive global effort towards controlling these diseases. In April 2002, the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Emerging Infections held a workshop to discuss globalization's influence on the spread and control of infectious disease. The Impact of Globalization on Infectious Disease Emergence and Control summarizes this workshop, in which participants explored the impact of increasingly integrated trade, economic development, human movement, and cultural exchange on patterns of disease emergence; identified opportunities for countering the effects of globalization on infectious diseases; examined the scientific evidence supporting current and potential global strategies; and considered newly available response methods and tools available for use by private industry, public health agencies, regulatory agencies, policy makers, and academic researchers. 

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What do you know about infectious disease?

For each child who dies from pneumonia in an industrialized country, about how many children die from the infection in developing countries?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Life-saving vaccines and medications aren’t distributed equitably around the world; for each child who dies from pneumonia in an industrialized country, more than 2,000 children die from the infection in developing countries.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Life-saving vaccines and medications aren’t distributed equitably around the world; for each child who dies from pneumonia in an industrialized country, more than 2,000 children die from the infection in developing countries.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Life-saving vaccines and medications aren’t distributed equitably around the world; for each child who dies from pneumonia in an industrialized country, more than 2,000 children die from the infection in developing countries.

  • Correct!

    Life-saving vaccines and medications aren’t distributed equitably around the world; for each child who dies from pneumonia in an industrialized country, more than 2,000 children die from the infection in developing countries.