The National Academies

The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Nuclear power provided what percentage of the total U.S. energy supply in 2013?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Correct!

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

Between 1980 and 2012, after fuel economy standards where put in place, which of the following has happened to vehicles?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Improved vehicle efficiency has allowed for increases in weight, horsepower and fuel economy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Improved vehicle efficiency has allowed for increases in weight, horsepower and fuel economy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Improved vehicle efficiency has allowed for increases in weight, horsepower and fuel economy.

  • Correct!

    Improved vehicle efficiency has allowed for increases in weight, horsepower and fuel economy.

Combustion of gasoline and diesel fuel emits which of the following?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Correct!

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

True or false? Fuel cells store energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Fuel cells are an efficient way to convert hydrogen to electricity, but the energy is stored in the hydrogen.

  • Correct!

    Fuel cells are an efficient way to convert hydrogen to electricity, but the energy is stored in the hydrogen.

What is the largest reservoir of stored solar energy?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Fossil fuels represent the largest source of stored solar energy, resulting from the transformation of biomass over millions of years into oil, natural gas and coal. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Fossil fuels represent the largest source of stored solar energy, resulting from the transformation of biomass over millions of years into oil, natural gas and coal. 

  • Correct!

    Fossil fuels represent the largest source of stored solar energy, resulting from the transformation of biomass over millions of years into oil, natural gas and coal. 

True or False: Burning coal in electric power plants is a major source of CO2 and other emissions. However, its use doesn't have negative consequences beyond the emissions caused by combustion.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Mining coal disturbs the land and modifies the chemistry of rainwater runoff, which in turn affects stream and river water quality.

  • Correct!

    Mining coal disturbs the land and modifies the chemistry of rainwater runoff, which in turn affects stream and river water quality.

The consumption of energy worldwide is projected to rise by how much between 2013 and 2040?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Correct!

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

Which source(s) of energy are not nuclear in origin?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Correct!

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

Energy intensity is a measure of:

  • Correct!

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

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The process of shifting from one prevailing state in regional or global climate to another. Often used interchangeably with “global warming,” scientists sometimes also use the term to refer to periods of climatic cooling. Climate change is typically the preferred term over “global warming” because it helps convey that there are climate changes in addition to rising temperatures.

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