The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

Industrial Efficiency

Researchers are exploring ways to make industrial and manufacturing processes much more efficient. Industry accounts for about 31% of all energy consumption in the United States, more than any other sector of the economy. Seven energy-intensive industries use three-fourths of that power: aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metal casting, mining, and steel. As a result, public/private-sector partnerships and research programs are focusing on those areas.

One of the prime targets is the chemical industry, which uses 29% of all fuel consumed in the U.S. industrial sector.

One of the prime targets is the chemical industry, which uses 29% of all fuel consumed in the U.S. industrial sector. There are more than 80,000 chemicals registered for use in the United States, and an estimated 2,000 new ones registered each year. Much of the fuel used by this industry comes from oil and natural gas, which are used both as energy sources for heat and as feedstocks, or raw materials, in the production of many chemicals. There are many opportunities to use energy more effectively in this industry, one being the processes used to separate chemicals and to enable chemical reactions.

The extraction and processing of mined materials, such as coal, consumes about 1.3 quads annually. In 2004, mining accounted for about 11% of the total energy consumed by the industrial sector and there are a variety of opportunities to improve the efficiency of mining operations. The equipment and processes used to search for and extract the ore, separate it from unwanted materials, and transport it all present opportunities for energy savings.

A similar effort is under way in analyzing the energy-intensive forest products industry. Researchers have identified enhanced raw materials, next-generation mill processes, improved fiber recycling, and wood processing as candidates for improvements in efficiency.

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Energy Hands-on

What do you know about energy?

About 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to what use?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Correct!

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

Energy Defined

Intermittent Energy Source

An energy source characterized by output that is dependent on the natural variability of the source rather than the requirements of consumers. Solar energy is an example of an intermittent energy source since it is only available when the sun is shining. Wind is also an intermittent energy source.

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National Academies Press

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