The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

What is the commonly accepted unit of measurement for electric current—or the amount of an electric charge passing a point per unit time?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Correct!

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

The United States is home to how many of the world's automobiles?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

  • Correct!

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

Which primary energy source did we depend on the most to generate electricity in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the United States depended most on coal to generate electricity. Coal provided approximately 49% of the electricity generated by the United States that year.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the United States depended most on coal to generate electricity. Coal provided approximately 49% of the electricity generated by the United States that year.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, the United States depended most on coal to generate electricity. Coal provided approximately 49% of the electricity generated by the United States that year.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the United States depended most on coal to generate electricity. Coal provided approximately 49% of the electricity generated by the United States that year.

By 2030, today's coal-fired power plants are projected to emit how much less CO2 than they emit now?

  • Correct!

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

Which renewable energy source contributed the most to the total energy consumed in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Correct!

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

In the United States, which economic sector releases the most CO2?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Correct!

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

The consumption of energy in the United States is projected to rise by how much between now and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by 13% between now and 2030.

  • Correct!

    U.S. consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by 13% between now and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by 13% between now and 2030.

True or False: Increasing the energy supply is the only answer to a stable energy future.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Reducing demand through the improved efficiency of devices and procedures is another way to improve our energy situation.

  • Correct!

    Reducing demand through the improved efficiency of devices and procedures is another way to improve our energy situation.

What percentage of U.S. electricity was generated by wind in 2008?

  • Correct!

    Almost 1% of U.S. electricity was generated by wind in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 1% of U.S. electricity was generated by wind in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 1% of U.S. electricity was generated by wind in 2008.

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Energy Hands-on

Energy Defined

Climate Change

The process of shifting from one prevailing state in regional or global climate to another. Often used interchangeably with “global warming,” scientists sometimes also use the term to refer to periods of climatic cooling. Climate change is typically the preferred term over “global warming” because it helps convey that there are climate changes in addition to rising temperatures.

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