The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Which of the following energy sources is not used to generate electricity in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Correct!

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

Which source(s) of energy are not nuclear in origin?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Correct!

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

Nuclear power provided what percentage of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Nuclear power accounted for 9% of the U.S. energy supply in 2008.

  • Correct!

    Nuclear power accounted for 9% of the U.S. energy supply in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Nuclear power accounted for 9% of the U.S. energy supply in 2008.

True or False: Burning coal in electric power plants is a major source of CO2 and other emissions. However, its use doesn't have negative consequences beyond the emissions caused by combustion.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Mining coal disturbs the land and modifies the chemistry of rainwater runoff, which in turn affects stream and river water quality.

  • Correct!

    Mining coal disturbs the land and modifies the chemistry of rainwater runoff, which in turn affects stream and river water quality.

In 2008, approximately how much of the oil used in the U.S. was imported?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the U.S. imported about 66% of its oil supply. This percentage is expected to grow even higher over the next two decades.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the U.S. imported about 66% of its oil supply. This percentage is expected to grow even higher over the next two decades.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, the U.S. imported about 66% of its oil supply. This percentage is expected to grow even higher over the next two decades.

In 2008, approximately how much energy did the United States use?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the United States used approximately 99.2 quads. One quad is about as much total energy as the city of Chicago requires in one year.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, the United States used approximately 99.2 quads. One quad is about as much total energy as the city of Chicago requires in one year.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the United States used approximately 99.2 quads. One quad is about as much total energy as the city of Chicago requires in one year.

Which of the following is not a primary energy source?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Correct!

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

How many commercial coal-fired power plants utilize carbon capture and sequestration practices in 2009?

  • Correct!

    In 2009, there were no commercial coal-fired plants utilizing carbon capture and sequestration.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2009, there were no commercial coal-fired plants utilizing carbon capture and sequestration.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2009, there were no commercial coal-fired plants utilizing carbon capture and sequestration.

How much of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America?

  • Correct!

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

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Clean Coal

Coal burned in power plants equipped with technologies that greatly reduce the emission of pollutants such as sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, and, potentially, carbon dioxide.

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