The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Which of the following is not a primary energy source?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Correct!

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

Which of the following is emitted by coal-fired power plants?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

  • Correct!

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

True or False: Burning biofuels does not release carbon dioxide.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Biofuels contain carbon and although they may burn “cleaner” than oil-derived fuels, they do not avoid generating carbon dioxide emissions.

  • Correct!

    Biofuels contain carbon and although they may burn “cleaner” than oil-derived fuels, they do not avoid generating carbon dioxide emissions.

The consumption of energy worldwide is projected to rise by how much between 2006 and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

  • Correct!

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

How much carbon dioxide is emitted by the average U.S. car driving one mile?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

  • Correct!

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

By 2030, today's coal-fired power plants are projected to emit how much less CO2 than they emit now?

  • Correct!

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

In 2008, of the four economic sectors, which used the most energy in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

Renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, biofuels, waste, and wood) accounted for what percentage of the total energy supply in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

  • Correct!

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

True or False: Increasing the energy supply is the only answer to a stable energy future.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Reducing demand through the improved efficiency of devices and procedures is another way to improve our energy situation.

  • Correct!

    Reducing demand through the improved efficiency of devices and procedures is another way to improve our energy situation.

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The act of capturing gaseous atmospheric carbon, usually in the form of CO2, and placing it into a carbon sink through either biological or physical processes.

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