The National Academies

The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

In 2014, approximately how much energy did the United States use, in quadrillion BTUs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption was about 98 quads in 2014.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption was about 98 quads in 2014.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption was about 98 quads in 2014.

  • Correct!

    U.S. energy consumption was about 98 quads in 2014.

True or false? Fuel cells store energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Fuel cells are an efficient way to convert hydrogen to electricity, but the energy is stored in the hydrogen.

  • Correct!

    Fuel cells are an efficient way to convert hydrogen to electricity, but the energy is stored in the hydrogen.

America, with 5% of the planet's population, consumes how much of the world's oil?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Correct!

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

True or false? Carbon capture and storage would reduce energy efficiency of a coal plant?

  • Correct!

    Carbon capture and storage will reduce energy efficiency of a coal plant, though it will decrease carbon emissions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Carbon capture and storage will reduce energy efficiency of a coal plant, though it will decrease carbon emissions.

The consumption of energy worldwide is projected to rise by how much between 2013 and 2040?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Correct!

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

In 2014, what percentage of the United States' total energy consumption came from oil?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the United States got 35% of its energy from petroleum, and experts project that demand for this fuel will rise at least through 2020. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the United States got 35% of its energy from petroleum, and experts project that demand for this fuel will rise at least through 2020. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the United States got 35% of its energy from petroleum, and experts project that demand for this fuel will rise at least through 2020. 

  • Correct!

    In 2014, the United States got 35% of its energy from petroleum, and experts project that demand for this fuel will rise at least through 2020. 

What technology was most responsible for increase in lighting efficiency from 45 Im/W in 2001 to 58 Im/W in 2010?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Increasing market share of compact fluorescents was primarily responsible for the increased lighting efficiency between 2001 and 2010.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Increasing market share of compact fluorescents was primarily responsible for the increased lighting efficiency between 2001 and 2010.

  • Correct!

    Increasing market share of compact fluorescents was primarily responsible for the increased lighting efficiency between 2001 and 2010.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Increasing market share of compact fluorescents was primarily responsible for the increased lighting efficiency between 2001 and 2010.

Which of the following energy sources releases carbon dioxide when burned?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Correct!

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

Which source(s) of energy are not nuclear in origin?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Correct!

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

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