The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Which of the following sources do experts expect will provide us with the “silver bullet” solution to our energy needs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Correct!

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

True or False: Increasing the energy supply is the only answer to a stable energy future.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Reducing demand through the improved efficiency of devices and procedures is another way to improve our energy situation.

  • Correct!

    Reducing demand through the improved efficiency of devices and procedures is another way to improve our energy situation.

How much electricity does an average U.S. household consume each year?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

  • Correct!

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

Which of the following energy sources releases carbon dioxide when burned?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Correct!

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

Which renewable energy source contributed the most to the total energy consumed in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Correct!

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

According to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards updated in December 2007, what is the average miles per gallon (mpg) required for new cars, SUVs, and light trucks (combined) by 2020?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

  • Correct!

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

How much of the world's CO2 is released by the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

  • Correct!

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

True or False: Burning biofuels does not release carbon dioxide.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Biofuels contain carbon and although they may burn “cleaner” than oil-derived fuels, they do not avoid generating carbon dioxide emissions.

  • Correct!

    Biofuels contain carbon and although they may burn “cleaner” than oil-derived fuels, they do not avoid generating carbon dioxide emissions.

In 2008, of the four economic sectors, which used the most energy in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

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Energy Hands-on

Energy Defined

Global Warming

A term used to describe the phenomenon of Earth’s rising average near-surface temperature. Although such fluctuations have occurred in the past due to natural causes, the term is most often used today to refer to current warming trends. Most scientists have concluded that this is very likely due to the observed increase in human-generated greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere.

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