The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Which two developing countries are expected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

  • Correct!

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

How much of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America?

  • Correct!

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

In the United States, which economic sector releases the most CO2?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Correct!

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

Which of the following is not a primary energy source?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Correct!

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

Which of the following sources do experts expect will provide us with the “silver bullet” solution to our energy needs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Correct!

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

About how much of the world's coal reserves are located in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    More than a quarter of the world's coal reserves are located in the United States.

  • Correct!

    More than a quarter of the world's coal reserves are located in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    More than a quarter of the world's coal reserves are located in the United States.

Which of the following is frequently used as a unit of measurement for the energy content of fuels?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The British Thermal Unit, or Btu, is frequently used as a measure for energy content of fuels. One gallon of gasoline contains about 124,000 Btu.

  • Correct!

    The British Thermal Unit, or Btu, is frequently used as a measure for energy content of fuels. One gallon of gasoline contains about 124,000 Btu.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The British Thermal Unit, or Btu, is frequently used as a measure for energy content of fuels. One gallon of gasoline contains about 124,000 Btu.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The British Thermal Unit, or Btu, is frequently used as a measure for energy content of fuels. One gallon of gasoline contains about 124,000 Btu.

Which of the following is not considered to be a drawback to wind energy?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Correct!

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

True or False: Burning coal in electric power plants is a major source of CO2 and other emissions. However, its use doesn't have negative consequences beyond the emissions caused by combustion.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Mining coal disturbs the land and modifies the chemistry of rainwater runoff, which in turn affects stream and river water quality.

  • Correct!

    Mining coal disturbs the land and modifies the chemistry of rainwater runoff, which in turn affects stream and river water quality.

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Energy Defined

Global Warming

A term used to describe the phenomenon of Earth’s rising average near-surface temperature. Although such fluctuations have occurred in the past due to natural causes, the term is most often used today to refer to current warming trends. Most scientists have concluded that this is very likely due to the observed increase in human-generated greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere.

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