The National Academies

The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, biofuels, waste, and wood) accounted for what percentage of the total energy supply in the United States in 2014?

  • Correct!

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

Energy intensity is a measure of:

  • Correct!

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

In 2014, what percentage of the United States' total energy consumption came from oil?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the United States got 35% of its energy from petroleum, and experts project that demand for this fuel will rise at least through 2020. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the United States got 35% of its energy from petroleum, and experts project that demand for this fuel will rise at least through 2020. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, the United States got 35% of its energy from petroleum, and experts project that demand for this fuel will rise at least through 2020. 

  • Correct!

    In 2014, the United States got 35% of its energy from petroleum, and experts project that demand for this fuel will rise at least through 2020. 

What percentage of harvested corn was used to produce ethanol in the U.S. in 2014?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Correct!

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

Nuclear power provided what percentage of the total U.S. energy supply in 2013?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Correct!

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

The United States is home to how many of the world's automobiles?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

  • Correct!

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

True or false? Fuel cells store energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Fuel cells are an efficient way to convert hydrogen to electricity, but the energy is stored in the hydrogen.

  • Correct!

    Fuel cells are an efficient way to convert hydrogen to electricity, but the energy is stored in the hydrogen.

What is the commonly accepted unit of measurement for electric current—or the amount of an electric charge passing a point per unit time?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Correct!

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

What percentage of commercial building energy is used by schools?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    School buildings represent 13% of commercial buildings energy use, or about 2.5% of total U.S. energy use (13% × 19%).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    School buildings represent 13% of commercial buildings energy use, or about 2.5% of total U.S. energy use (13% × 19%).

  • Correct!

    School buildings represent 13% of commercial buildings energy use, or about 2.5% of total U.S. energy use (13% × 19%).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    School buildings represent 13% of commercial buildings energy use, or about 2.5% of total U.S. energy use (13% × 19%).

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