The National Academies

The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

According to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, what is the average miles per gallon (mpg) required for new cars, SUVs, and light trucks (combined) by 2025?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The most recent federal efficiency standards, finalized by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2012, are projected to increase fuel economy to the equivalent of 54.5 mpg for cars and light-duty trucks by model year 2025, while also reducing CO2 emissions. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The most recent federal efficiency standards, finalized by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2012, are projected to increase fuel economy to the equivalent of 54.5 mpg for cars and light-duty trucks by model year 2025, while also reducing CO2 emissions. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The most recent federal efficiency standards, finalized by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2012, are projected to increase fuel economy to the equivalent of 54.5 mpg for cars and light-duty trucks by model year 2025, while also reducing CO2 emissions. 

  • Correct!

    The most recent federal efficiency standards, finalized by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2012, are projected to increase fuel economy to the equivalent of 54.5 mpg for cars and light-duty trucks by model year 2025, while also reducing CO2 emissions. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The most recent federal efficiency standards, finalized by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2012, are projected to increase fuel economy to the equivalent of 54.5 mpg for cars and light-duty trucks by model year 2025, while also reducing CO2 emissions. 

Renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, biofuels, waste, and wood) accounted for what percentage of the total energy supply in the United States in 2014?

  • Correct!

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

Which of the following sources do experts expect will provide us with the “silver bullet” solution to our energy needs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Correct!

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

What percentage of harvested corn was used to produce ethanol in the U.S. in 2014?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Correct!

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, about 38% of harvested corn in the US went to make ethanol and its associated coproducts

The consumption of energy worldwide is projected to rise by how much between 2013 and 2040?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

  • Correct!

    U.S. energy consumption is projected to rise 9% by 2040, or 0.3% per  year, while global consumption will increase about 50% over the same period 

What type of transportation uses the most total energy?

  • Correct!

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

America, with 5% of the planet's population, consumes how much of the world's oil?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Correct!

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

What is the largest reservoir of stored solar energy?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Fossil fuels represent the largest source of stored solar energy, resulting from the transformation of biomass over millions of years into oil, natural gas and coal. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Fossil fuels represent the largest source of stored solar energy, resulting from the transformation of biomass over millions of years into oil, natural gas and coal. 

  • Correct!

    Fossil fuels represent the largest source of stored solar energy, resulting from the transformation of biomass over millions of years into oil, natural gas and coal. 

A typical incandescent lamp (traditional light bulb) consumes 60 watts of power. How much do each of a compact fluorescent and LED lamp consume, in watts, to produce the same amount of light?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    A typical incandescent lamp (traditional light bulb) that consumes 60 watts of power produces around 800 lumens. A compact fluorescent lamp emits the same amount of light while using only 13 watts. And an LED lamp consumes only 10 watts to give off the same 800 lumens.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    A typical incandescent lamp (traditional light bulb) that consumes 60 watts of power produces around 800 lumens. A compact fluorescent lamp emits the same amount of light while using only 13 watts. And an LED lamp consumes only 10 watts to give off the same 800 lumens.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    A typical incandescent lamp (traditional light bulb) that consumes 60 watts of power produces around 800 lumens. A compact fluorescent lamp emits the same amount of light while using only 13 watts. And an LED lamp consumes only 10 watts to give off the same 800 lumens.

  • Correct!

    A typical incandescent lamp (traditional light bulb) that consumes 60 watts of power produces around 800 lumens. A compact fluorescent lamp emits the same amount of light while using only 13 watts. And an LED lamp consumes only 10 watts to give off the same 800 lumens.

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