The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Which source(s) of energy are not nuclear in origin?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Correct!

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

The consumption of energy worldwide is projected to rise by how much between 2006 and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

  • Correct!

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

How much of the world's CO2 is released by the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

  • Correct!

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

True or False: Burning coal in electric power plants is a major source of CO2 and other emissions. However, its use doesn't have negative consequences beyond the emissions caused by combustion.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Mining coal disturbs the land and modifies the chemistry of rainwater runoff, which in turn affects stream and river water quality.

  • Correct!

    Mining coal disturbs the land and modifies the chemistry of rainwater runoff, which in turn affects stream and river water quality.

What percentage of America's total energy came from wind in 2008?

  • Correct!

    In 2008, wind accounted for 0.5% of America's energy portfolio.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, wind accounted for 0.5% of America's energy portfolio.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, wind accounted for 0.5% of America's energy portfolio.

How much electricity does an average U.S. household consume each year?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

  • Correct!

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

The United States is home to how many of the world's automobiles?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

  • Correct!

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

Which of the following sources do experts expect will provide us with the “silver bullet” solution to our energy needs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Correct!

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

About 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to what use?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Correct!

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

Place this badge on your facebook page to show your friends what you know about energy.

Get the badge

Place this badge on your facebook page to show your friends what you know about energy.

Get the badge

OR, get a higher score to unlock a different badge.

Retake the quiz

Place this badge on your facebook page to show your friends what you know about energy.

Get the badge

OR, get a higher score to unlock a different badge.

Retake the quiz

Explore Other Topics

Energy Hands-on

Energy Defined

British Thermal Unit

A unit of measure for the energy content of fuels. One Btu is the amount of energy needed to raise a pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit.

View our full glossary