The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

About 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to what use?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Correct!

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Roughly 21% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings goes to lighting.

Which of the following energy sources is not used to generate electricity in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Correct!

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

The United States is home to how many of the world's automobiles?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

  • Correct!

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    With less than 5% of the world's population, the United States is home to one-third of the world's automobiles.

According to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards updated in December 2007, what is the average miles per gallon (mpg) required for new cars, SUVs, and light trucks (combined) by 2020?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

  • Correct!

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

What percentage of U.S. electricity was generated by wind in 2008?

  • Correct!

    Almost 1% of U.S. electricity was generated by wind in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 1% of U.S. electricity was generated by wind in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 1% of U.S. electricity was generated by wind in 2008.

In 2008, of the four economic sectors, which used the most energy in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

Which of the following sources do experts expect will provide us with the “silver bullet” solution to our energy needs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Correct!

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

Which of the following is emitted by coal-fired power plants?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

  • Correct!

    All of the above are emitted from coal-fired power plants and can be harmful to our health and the environment.

Which source(s) of energy are not nuclear in origin?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Correct!

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

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