The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

The consumption of energy in the United States is projected to rise by how much between now and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by 13% between now and 2030.

  • Correct!

    U.S. consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by 13% between now and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by 13% between now and 2030.

Which two developing countries are expected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

  • Correct!

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

Which of the following is not considered to be a drawback to wind energy?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

  • Correct!

    While wind energy has many benefits, all of the above are considered drawbacks to wind energy.

About how much of the world's coal reserves are located in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    More than a quarter of the world's coal reserves are located in the United States.

  • Correct!

    More than a quarter of the world's coal reserves are located in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    More than a quarter of the world's coal reserves are located in the United States.

Which of the following is considered an obstacle to cars running on hydrogen fuel cells?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the reasons mentioned are considered obstacles to producing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the reasons mentioned are considered obstacles to producing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the reasons mentioned are considered obstacles to producing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

  • Correct!

    All of the reasons mentioned are considered obstacles to producing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

True or False: Burning biofuels does not release carbon dioxide.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Biofuels contain carbon and although they may burn “cleaner” than oil-derived fuels, they do not avoid generating carbon dioxide emissions.

  • Correct!

    Biofuels contain carbon and although they may burn “cleaner” than oil-derived fuels, they do not avoid generating carbon dioxide emissions.

According to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards updated in December 2007, what is the average miles per gallon (mpg) required for new cars, SUVs, and light trucks (combined) by 2020?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

  • Correct!

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Based upon the 2007 CAFE standards, the new average mpg required by 2020 is 35 mpg.

How much carbon dioxide is emitted by the average U.S. car driving one mile?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

  • Correct!

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

As an automobile fuel, what amount of hydrogen compares with a gallon of gasoline?

  • Correct!

    A gallon of gasoline contains about the same energy as a kg of hydrogen. Although fuel cells are expected to be twice as efficient as gasoline vehicles, hydrogen is very diffuse and storing an ample supply on board represents an engineering challenge.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    A gallon of gasoline contains about the same energy as 1 kg of hydrogen. Although fuel cells are expected to be twice as efficient as gasoline vehicles, hydrogen is very diffuse and storing an ample supply on board represents an engineering challenge.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    A gallon of gasoline contains about the same energy as 1 kg of hydrogen. Although fuel cells are expected to be twice as efficient as gasoline vehicles, hydrogen is very diffuse and storing an ample supply on board represents an engineering challenge.

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Energy Hands-on

Energy Defined

Intermittent Energy Source

An energy source characterized by output that is dependent on the natural variability of the source rather than the requirements of consumers. Solar energy is an example of an intermittent energy source since it is only available when the sun is shining. Wind is also an intermittent energy source.

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