The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Which of the following energy sources is not used to generate electricity in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

  • Correct!

    Oil, biofuels, natural gas, and coal are all used to generate electricity in the United States.

The consumption of energy worldwide is projected to rise by how much between 2006 and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

  • Correct!

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

How much carbon dioxide is emitted by the average U.S. car driving one mile?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

  • Correct!

    The average U.S. car gets 21.4 mpg. About 19 pounds of carbon dioxide are emitted for every gallon burned, or 0.9 lb/mile.

True or False: Lighting accounts for 18% of all electricity used in the United States.

  • Correct!

    Lighting accounts for 18% of the electricity used in the United States. A 12% decrease in overall electricity use in buildings could be realized if incandescent bulbs were replaced with CFL or LED bulbs.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Lighting accounts for 18% of the electricity used in the United States. A 12% decrease in overall electricity use in buildings could be realized if incandescent bulbs were replaced with CFL or LED bulbs.

Energy intensity is a measure of:

  • Correct!

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

How much of the world's CO2 is released by the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

  • Correct!

    Almost 20% of the world's CO2 is released by the United States.

In the United States, which economic sector releases the most CO2?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Correct!

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In the United States, the transportation sector releases the most CO2. In 2006, the transportation sector released nearly 2 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, nearly all of which was from oil.

Of the following fossil fuels, which is typically the least expensive for its energy content?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

  • Correct!

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

By 2030, today's coal-fired power plants are projected to emit how much less CO2 than they emit now?

  • Correct!

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Coal-fired power plants are likely to emit 30% less CO2 in 2030.

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Energy Hands-on

Energy Defined

Intermittent Energy Source

An energy source characterized by output that is dependent on the natural variability of the source rather than the requirements of consumers. Solar energy is an example of an intermittent energy source since it is only available when the sun is shining. Wind is also an intermittent energy source.

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