The National Academies

The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Which of the following sources do experts expect will provide us with the “silver bullet” solution to our energy needs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Correct!

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

Renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, biofuels, waste, and wood) accounted for what percentage of the total energy supply in the United States in 2014?

  • Correct!

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2014, 10% of our total energy use came from renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, solar, and hydropower.

How efficient are ordinary commercial solar cell units?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, the very best experimental units could convert more than 40% of light energy to electricity; ordinary commercial units are in the range of 5% to 20%. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, the very best experimental units could convert more than 40% of light energy to electricity; ordinary commercial units are in the range of 5% to 20%. 

  • Correct!

    As of 2014, the very best experimental units could convert more than 40% of light energy to electricity; ordinary commercial units are in the range of 5% to 20%. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, the very best experimental units could convert more than 40% of light energy to electricity; ordinary commercial units are in the range of 5% to 20%. 

Which renewable energy source contributed the most to the total energy consumed in the United States in 2014?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Wood and waste biomass, along with biofuels, accounted for about 50% of the U.S. renewable energy supply in 2014, and more than 4% of all energy consumed. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Wood and waste biomass, along with biofuels, accounted for about 50% of the U.S. renewable energy supply in 2014, and more than 4% of all energy consumed. 

  • Correct!

    Wood and waste biomass, along with biofuels, accounted for about 50% of the U.S. renewable energy supply in 2014, and more than 4% of all energy consumed. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Wood and waste biomass, along with biofuels, accounted for about 50% of the U.S. renewable energy supply in 2014, and more than 4% of all energy consumed. 

Which of the following is not a primary energy source?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Correct!

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

Nuclear power provided what percentage of the total U.S. energy supply in 2013?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Correct!

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    19% of our electricity was generated  by nuclear fuel in 2013. 

Which of the following energy sources releases carbon dioxide when burned?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

  • Correct!

    Gasoline, diesel fuel, and natural gas all release CO2 when burned.

Combustion of gasoline and diesel fuel emits which of the following?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Correct!

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

Energy intensity is a measure of:

  • Correct!

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

Place this badge on your facebook page to show your friends what you know about energy.

Get the badge

Place this badge on your facebook page to show your friends what you know about energy.

Get the badge

OR, get a higher score to unlock a different badge.

Retake the quiz

Place this badge on your facebook page to show your friends what you know about energy.

Get the badge

OR, get a higher score to unlock a different badge.

Retake the quiz

Explore Other Topics

Energy Hands-on

The Promise of Better Lighting

Energy savings through lighting technology

Energy Defined

Gigawatt

One billion watts, a watt being a unit of measure of power, or how fast energy is used. Gigawatts are typically used to describe very large quantities of power, such as the power carried by a major section of the U.S. electrical grid.

View our full glossary