The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, biofuels, waste, and wood) accounted for what percentage of the total energy supply in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

  • Correct!

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

Of the following fossil fuels, which is typically the least expensive for its energy content?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

  • Correct!

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

Most of the world's energy originates from which two primary sources:

  • Correct!

    The energy we capture for use on Earth comes largely from the sun or from nuclear forces local to our own planet.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The energy we capture for use on Earth comes largely from the sun or from nuclear forces local to our own planet.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The energy we capture for use on Earth comes largely from the sun or from nuclear forces local to our own planet.

Which of the following sources do experts expect will provide us with the “silver bullet” solution to our energy needs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

  • Correct!

    There is no silver bullet. Tomorrow’s energy, like today’s, will come from a variety of sources.

Which of the following is frequently used as a unit of measurement for the energy content of fuels?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The British Thermal Unit, or Btu, is frequently used as a measure for energy content of fuels. One gallon of gasoline contains about 124,000 Btu.

  • Correct!

    The British Thermal Unit, or Btu, is frequently used as a measure for energy content of fuels. One gallon of gasoline contains about 124,000 Btu.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The British Thermal Unit, or Btu, is frequently used as a measure for energy content of fuels. One gallon of gasoline contains about 124,000 Btu.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The British Thermal Unit, or Btu, is frequently used as a measure for energy content of fuels. One gallon of gasoline contains about 124,000 Btu.

What is the commonly accepted unit of measurement for electric current—or the amount of an electric charge passing a point per unit time?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Correct!

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

Which residential usage consumes the largest amount of energy?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Consuming the largest amount of energy, space heating accounts for 31% of all residential energy used. Space cooling accounts for an additional 12% of energy usage.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Consuming the largest amount of energy, space heating accounts for 31% of all residential energy used. Space cooling accounts for an additional 12% of energy usage.

  • Correct!

    Consuming the largest amount of energy, space heating accounts for 31% of all residential energy used. Space cooling accounts for an additional 12% of energy usage.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Consuming the largest amount of energy, space heating accounts for 31% of all residential energy used. Space cooling accounts for an additional 12% of energy usage.

Combustion of gasoline and diesel fuel emits which of the following?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Correct!

    All of the above are emitted by vehicles running on gasoline and diesel fuel.

What percentage of the coal mined in the United States was used to generate electricity in 2006?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    90% of the coal mined in the United States was used to generate electricity in 2006.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    90% of the coal mined in the United States was used to generate electricity in 2006.

  • Correct!

    90% of the coal mined in the United States was used to generate electricity in 2006.

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Energy Hands-on

Energy Defined

Kilowatt Hour (kWh)

A unit of measure for energy, typically applied to electricity usage. It is equal to the amount of energy used at a rate of 1000 watts over the course of one hour. One kWh is roughly equal to 3,412 British Thermal Units (Btu).

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