The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

Energy intensity is a measure of:

  • Correct!

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Energy intensity is a measure of a nation's energy efficiency represented through energy use per unit of GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

Which renewable energy source contributed the most to the total energy consumed in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Correct!

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

Which two developing countries are expected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

  • Correct!

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

True or False: U.S. domestic production of crude oil has declined since around 1970.

  • Correct!

    U.S. domestic production of crude oil peaked around 1970 at about 9.5 million barrels per day (MBD) and declined to about 5.1 MBD by 2006.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. domestic production of crude oil peaked around 1970 at about 9.5 million barrels per day (MBD) and declined to about 5.1 MBD by 2006.

True or False: Burning biofuels does not release carbon dioxide.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Biofuels contain carbon and although they may burn “cleaner” than oil-derived fuels, they do not avoid generating carbon dioxide emissions.

  • Correct!

    Biofuels contain carbon and although they may burn “cleaner” than oil-derived fuels, they do not avoid generating carbon dioxide emissions.

How much electricity does an average U.S. household consume each year?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

  • Correct!

    The average U.S. household consumes an average of 10,000 kilowatt-hours each year.

Which of the following is not a primary energy source?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Correct!

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Electricity is a secondary energy source because it can only be produced from the use of primary energy sources such as coal, natural gas, or nuclear reactions.

The consumption of energy worldwide is projected to rise by how much between 2006 and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

  • Correct!

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Worldwide consumption of energy sources is projected to rise by nearly 50% between 2006 and 2030.

In 2008, of the four economic sectors, which used the most energy in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

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