The National Academies

The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

What is the commonly accepted unit of measurement for electric current—or the amount of an electric charge passing a point per unit time?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Correct!

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The ampere, or amp, is the most commonly used measurement for electric current.

How many gallons of water are required to hydraulically fracture a well, on average in the U.S.?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The national average is around 1.5 million gallons per well , according to the EPA.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The national average is around 1.5 million gallons per well , according to the EPA.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The national average is around 1.5 million gallons per well , according to the EPA.

  • Correct!

    The national average is around 1.5 million gallons per well , according to the EPA.

America, with 5% of the planet's population, consumes how much of the world's oil?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Correct!

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    As of 2014, total world consumption was approximately 92 million barrels per day, about 19 million or 21% of which were used by the United States.

What type of transportation uses the most total energy?

  • Correct!

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    By far the largest share of energy in transportation is consumed by cars, light trucks, and motorcycles—about 58% in 2012, followed by other trucks (21%), aircraft (9%), boats and ships (3%), and trains and buses (3%). Pipelines account for 3% and military uses for 2%.

Which renewable energy source contributed the most to the total energy consumed in the United States in 2014?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Wood and waste biomass, along with biofuels, accounted for about 50% of the U.S. renewable energy supply in 2014, and more than 4% of all energy consumed. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Wood and waste biomass, along with biofuels, accounted for about 50% of the U.S. renewable energy supply in 2014, and more than 4% of all energy consumed. 

  • Correct!

    Wood and waste biomass, along with biofuels, accounted for about 50% of the U.S. renewable energy supply in 2014, and more than 4% of all energy consumed. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Wood and waste biomass, along with biofuels, accounted for about 50% of the U.S. renewable energy supply in 2014, and more than 4% of all energy consumed. 

What percentage of commercial building energy is used by schools?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    School buildings represent 13% of commercial buildings energy use, or about 2.5% of total U.S. energy use (13% × 19%).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    School buildings represent 13% of commercial buildings energy use, or about 2.5% of total U.S. energy use (13% × 19%).

  • Correct!

    School buildings represent 13% of commercial buildings energy use, or about 2.5% of total U.S. energy use (13% × 19%).

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    School buildings represent 13% of commercial buildings energy use, or about 2.5% of total U.S. energy use (13% × 19%).

Which source(s) of energy are not nuclear in origin?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Correct!

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Tidal energy is gravitational in origin. Solar energy comes from nuclear reactions in the sun, and geothermal energy comes from radioactive decay inside the earth.

Which has been growing more, energy to heat homes or energy to cool homes?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Current trends indicate that by 2040 residential buildings will consume up to 28% less energy for heating but about 50% more for cooling. 

  • Correct!

    Current trends indicate that by 2040 residential buildings will consume up to 28% less energy for heating but about 50% more for cooling. 

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Current trends indicate that by 2040 residential buildings will consume up to 28% less energy for heating but about 50% more for cooling. 

In 2014, approximately how much energy did the United States use, in quadrillion BTUs?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption was about 98 quads in 2014.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption was about 98 quads in 2014.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    U.S. energy consumption was about 98 quads in 2014.

  • Correct!

    U.S. energy consumption was about 98 quads in 2014.

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