The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

What do you know about energy?

In 2008, approximately how much energy did the United States use?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the United States used approximately 99.2 quads. One quad is about as much total energy as the city of Chicago requires in one year.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, the United States used approximately 99.2 quads. One quad is about as much total energy as the city of Chicago requires in one year.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the United States used approximately 99.2 quads. One quad is about as much total energy as the city of Chicago requires in one year.

How much of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America?

  • Correct!

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Less than 2% of the U.S. supply of natural gas is imported from outside North America.

Which renewable energy source contributed the most to the total energy consumed in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

  • Correct!

    Out of all the renewable energy sources, biomass contributed the most to U.S. energy consumption in 2008.

Of the following fossil fuels, which is typically the least expensive for its energy content?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

  • Correct!

    In 2005, a million Btu of energy from coal cost approximately $2, versus $5 for natural gas and $10 for oil. However, prices can fluctuate due to changes in the economy and new government policies.

Which of the following is considered an obstacle to cars running on hydrogen fuel cells?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the reasons mentioned are considered obstacles to producing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the reasons mentioned are considered obstacles to producing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    All of the reasons mentioned are considered obstacles to producing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

  • Correct!

    All of the reasons mentioned are considered obstacles to producing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

Renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, biofuels, waste, and wood) accounted for what percentage of the total energy supply in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

  • Correct!

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

What percentage of America's total energy came from wind in 2008?

  • Correct!

    In 2008, wind accounted for 0.5% of America's energy portfolio.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, wind accounted for 0.5% of America's energy portfolio.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, wind accounted for 0.5% of America's energy portfolio.

In 2008, approximately how much of the oil used in the U.S. was imported?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the U.S. imported about 66% of its oil supply. This percentage is expected to grow even higher over the next two decades.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, the U.S. imported about 66% of its oil supply. This percentage is expected to grow even higher over the next two decades.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, the U.S. imported about 66% of its oil supply. This percentage is expected to grow even higher over the next two decades.

Which two developing countries are expected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

  • Correct!

    The United States and Canada are both developed countries. China and India are projected to have the greatest growth in energy consumption between 2006 and 2030.

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The achievement of using less energy without reducing the benefit provided by the end-use service. Energy efficiency is exemplified in a wide variety of applications—from improved lightbulbs and refrigeration to less energy-intensive industrial and manufacturing processes.

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