The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward (2005)

Based on the findings of the NRC’s 2001 report Energy Research at DOE: Was It Worth It?, Congress directed DOE to request the NRC to develop a methodology for assessing prospective benefits. The first phase of this project-development of the methodology-began in December 2003. The methodology includes a rigorous definition of benefits to be used consistently for all programs; scenarios about future world states that are common to all technologies; a "decision tree framework" for ensuring that the role of government support, key technology, and market uncertainties are considered in the benefits calculation; a results matrix that summarizes the data and estimated benefits; and simplified models for calculating benefits at pivotal stages of each project. This report presents the results of phase one, revealing some weaknesses in the methodology that need to be addressed and the importance of allocating some resources to support the use of the methodology. Phase two will work on making the methodology more robust and explore related issues, and subsequent phases will apply the methodology to review the prospective benefits of different DOE fossil energy and energy efficiency R&D programs.

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Energy Hands-on

What do you know about energy?

In 2008, of the four economic sectors, which used the most energy in the United States?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.

  • Correct!

    In 2008, industry used 31% of the total energy used; next was transportation at 28%, then residential at 22%, and commercial at 19%.