The National Academies: What You Need To Know About Energy

The National Academies

What You Need To Know About Energy

Review of DOE’s Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program (2007)

There has been a substantial resurgence of interest in nuclear power in the United States over the past few years. One consequence has been a rapid growth in the research budget of DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). In light of this growth, the Office of Management and Budget included within the FY2006 budget request a study by the National Academies to review the NE research programs and recommend priorities among those programs. The programs to be evaluated were: Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010), Generation IV (GEN IV), the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)/Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facilities. This report presents a description and analysis of each program along with specific findings and recommendations. It also provides an assessment of program priorities and oversight. Overall, the report recommended that the NE program put its highest priorities on NP2010 to ensure timely and cost-effective deployment of the first new reactor plants; research in support of the commercial fleet of reactors; and research to strengthen higher education’s capabilities to educate a growing number of young professionals and scientists in areas relevant to nuclear energy research.

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Energy Hands-on

What do you know about energy?

Renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, biofuels, waste, and wood) accounted for what percentage of the total energy supply in the United States in 2008?

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

  • Correct!

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.

  • Sorry, that’s incorrect.

    Renewable energy accounted for 7% of the total U.S. energy supply in 2008, less than any other type of energy source.